October’s Meeting Held

The first meeting of the 2014/15 year was held October 1, 2014. The topic was “Boots on the Ground: “Hazard Identification and Mitigation.” Thank you to Sam Brusco, of Brusco Design & Renovation, for his table top exercise, and Joseph Werbicki, M.S., CSP, Safety and Health Consultant, for his presentation on individual safe behavior. SAFER would also like to thank Ocean State Risk Management (OSRM) for sponsoring a Continental Breakfast and NEIT for sponsoring the meeting place.

For those who missed it the following link is for the BTEA Newsletter that was passed around.

3M Horizontal Lifeline Recall

From 3M:
“A recent analysis of 3M™ Model Number SWSW Series Mobile SkyWalk horizontal lifeline systems identified that these systems may not satisfactorily meet the minimum requirements of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.66, 1926.502 regulations and may not arrest a fall in the working clearances stated in 3M user manuals. This system was previously sold under the name Aearo Series Mobile SkyWalk system or SafeWaze Series Mobile SkyWalk system”.

You can find the recall notice in the SAFER Recall link under “Fall Protection”.

Updates to OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule

From OSHA’s QuickTakes September 15, 2014 · Volume 13, Issue 18

OSHA expands requirement for reporting fatalities and severe injuries and updates the list of industries exempt from recordkeeping requirements.

A final rule announced Sept. 11 requires employers to notify OSHA when an employee is killed on the job or suffers a work-related hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye. The rule, which also updates the list of employers partially exempt from OSHA record-keeping requirements, will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2015 for workplaces under federal OSHA jurisdiction.

“Today, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 4,405 workers were killed on the job in 2013. We can and must do more to keep America’s workers safe and healthy,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. “Workplace injuries and fatalities are absolutely preventable, and these new requirements will help OSHA focus its resources and hold employers accountable for preventing them.”

“Hospitalizations and amputations are sentinel events, indicating that serious hazards are likely to be present at a workplace and that an intervention is warranted to protect the other workers at the establishment,” said Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health.

Under the revised rule, employers will be required to notify OSHA of work-related fatalities within eight hours, and work-related in-patient hospitalizations, amputations or losses of an eye within 24 hours. Previously, OSHA’s regulations required an employer to report only work-related fatalities and in-patient hospitalizations of three or more employees. Reporting single hospitalizations, amputations or loss of an eye was not required under the previous rule.

Employers can report these events by telephone to the nearest OSHA Area Office during normal business hours or the 24-hour OSHA hotline 1-800-321-OSHA [6742], or electronically through a new tool which will be released soon and accessible at www.osha.gov/report_online.

In a final rule posted in the Federal Register on Sept. 11, OSHA has also updated the list of industries that, due to relatively low occupational injury and illness rates, are exempt from the requirement to routinely keep injury and illness records. The rule will go into effect Jan. 1, 2015 for workplaces under federal OSHA jurisdiction.

The previous list of exempt industries was based on the old Standard Industrial Classification system and the new rule uses the North American Industry Classification System to classify establishments by industry. The new list is based on updated injury and illness data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The new rule maintains the exemption for any employer with 10 or fewer employees, regardless of their industry classification, from the requirement to routinely keep records of worker injuries and illnesses.

OSHA has posted a new website with plain language materials about the new requirements. For more information on the industries now exempt from keeping records or new industries now covered, please visit www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014. OSHA has also posted training material and other guidance on how to keep OSHA records to make it easy for newly covered employers to comply.

All employers covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act, even those who are exempt from maintaining injury and illness records, are required to comply with OSHA’s new severe injury and illness reporting requirements. For more information, see the news release, Assistant Secretary Michaels’ statement, and OSHA’s new Web page on the revised rule.